June 2nd in Saarbrücken at the “#Indigenous #PopCulture” Conference

On June 2nd, Red Haircrow will give a presentation at the “Indigenous Popular Culture Conference” at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany. The conference is titled: “A Long Time Ago on a Reservation Far, Far Away: Contemporary Indigenous Popular Culture across the Globe.”

ABSTRACT: “While many people express growing boredom with Hollywood and other western film studios producing sub-standard, unoriginal movies or rebooting television series or films of the past, the Native indie film industry is booming. Despite the low ebb of unique productions to which even Hollywood admits, scripts by people of color, including Natives, continue to be rejected and ignored primarily because they don’t fit the stereotypical material usually churned out about them by others.

Thus, more Native filmmakers today than ever before are writing, filming and sharing their own work, by Natives for everyone, representing and presenting themselves and their stories, whether fiction or non-fiction. More Native artists and filmmakers are collaborating and coming together in events, such as the Indigenous Comic-Con whose inaugural celebration took place in November 2016, to encourage and promote each other. It is also open to the public, and all are welcome.

Discussion will include why films about Natives made by Natives so important; what the issues and benefits are both for Native individuals, nations and communities, and non-Natives; and the intersectionality of native films with social justice, activism and sovereignty. Material will include visual examples of contemporary native films, filmmakers, production companies and organizations, such as A Tribe Called Geek that report on, encourage and promote contemporary artists and filmmakers.”

More details about the event, here.

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New Music Video of #JazzPiano: “City to Seaside” by Uli Lenz

From German jazz piano extraordinaire, Uli Lenz, the original composition by Mr. Lenz performed live in solo concert on Dec. 12, 2016 at Piano Salon Christophori in Berlin, Germany. With a fast moving, fun tempo, the music was set to pace in the video created by Flying With Red Haircrow Productions and titled, “City to Seaside.”

Uli Lenz is a well renown jazz pianist and musical ambassador from Germany, who has played around the world. In Kenya, he was called “The man who dances on the keys” due to his energetic style and superb skills, having a particularly strong left hand. Lenz is considered a brilliant technician, and has worked with such legendary musicians such as: Victor Jones on drums, Joe Chambers and Horacio El Negro Hernandez, Cecil McBee on bass, Ira Coleman and Ed Schuller, as well as artists such as Steve Grossman, Hannibal Marvin Peterson and François Jeanneau. Discography, biography and “where to buy” links are available at his website http://ulilenz.com/.

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#Author #Interview With Michelle E. Lowe on #Writing & #Steampunk Novel “Legacy”

Interview with author Michelle E. Lowe. Find them on social media:

 

Q:  Who or what was your inspiration for writing?

A:  I find that the world itself holds an abundant of inspiration. Real stories, small moments, even a basic conversation someone might be having on the bus. If a keen ear listens in at just the right time, an idea for a novel is there. I’ve gotten lots and lots of helpful insights from history and love to incorporate certain historical events into my work.

 

Q:  What books are currently on your nightstand?

A:  I’ve just started on Stephen King’s The Dark Tower series. I’m on Book One: The Gunslinger. It’s very, very good so far. I’m aiming to get through most of the series before the TV show adaptation comes out. The release date just got pushed back, so I might be able to make it.

 

Q:  What would you like readers to know about you the individual?

A:  For starters, I’m a big nerd at heart. I love watching and reading science-fiction and fantasy stories, and I highly enjoy old B horror films. I’m extremely fond of old Atari video games, like Dig Dug, Montezuma’s Revenge, Space Invaders, Centipede, Mrs. Pacman, and so on. I collect worthless little knickknacks, and I enjoy oil painting as a hobby. I’d like to do a lot more world traveling, starting with England. Also, I adore animals, and wish I had many more of them around to take care of.

 

 

Q:  What do you write?

A:  Generally, I write fiction. Recently I’ve ventured into steampunk. That’s a fun genre to go into. It takes a lot of imagination to succeed at it too. That’s what I love about fiction and writing fiction; people can play around with facts and build worlds. There’s a lot of intelligence and creativity that goes into writing fiction, I believe. There’s much that can be created, so many imaginative ways to explain how made up things function. You really work your brain coming up with how everything goes and make it believable no matter how unbelievable it is!

 

Q:  What was your first published work and when was it published?

A:  In 2011, I self-published my first novel, The Warning. I had joined the wave of entrepreneurs, staring wide-eyed at Amazon’s free self-publishing program. Freedom! We thought. A chance to show our work to the world without the gatekeepers telling us our stories aren’t good enough, or dumping thousands of dollars in a vanity press in the hopes that we’ll make that loot back. There have been loads of pros and cons with this vastness of published work constantly being pumped out; one being that it’s extremely difficult for just about any author to get notice. In the end, though, it’s nice that storytellers can share their tales without the heavy hand of Big House Publishing halting them. I will say that it is also nice to have something you’ve written recognized by a publisher.

 

Q:  Do you listen to music or have another form of inspiration when you are writing?

A:  Not only do I listen to music when I’m writing, but when I’m also planning evil deeds. 😉 Seriously, listening to music is a must for me. I’m listening to music right now while I’m answering this! The dead silence bores me to tears. When it comes to inspiration, music has helped in many ways. There have been certain songs that I’ve imagined scenes to books I’m writing or about to write. Kind of like a montage taking place inside my head. One song in particular, if I’m allowed to say it, The Underground by Jane’s Addiction, opened up ideas for me in the third installment to my Legacy series. Music is downright a wonderful art form that I never want to be too far away from.

 

Q:  Most people envision an author’s life as being really glamorous. What’s the most unglamorous thing that you’ve done in the past week?

A:  If locking yourself up inside a dark room and cutting off from the outside world for so long that your friends and family start worrying if you’re alive or dead, glamorous, than sure! Completely! I don’t view an author’s life as being glamorous in the least, but it is interesting, especially how authors are able to pull stories out of thin air, and the rituals they do to go about getting their work done. After the book is written, polished, and put out there with a shiny new-to-the-world cover; the proud author signing his or hers novel to a line of eager fans, it could appear to be glamorous, I suppose. In truth, there is a lot of self loathing, insecurity, constant self doubt, pressure and great strain that a writer is always going through, no matter what level they are in the profession. In my opinion, a cocky writer is most likely not a very good one. For a story to reach a certain peak in order to be a great tale, the writer needs to sweat, worry, and always second guess themselves. It forces us to rethink and make the book better for our readers who deserve nothing less from us. The least glamorous thing I’ve done in the past week was getting into my car and driving south toward Mexico just to get away from the frustration of writing and revising.

 

Q:  How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

A:  Published books, only eight as well as a collection of short stories. I’ve written out five more books for the Legacy series already, and have just completed a standalone for it as well. With any luck I’ll have the second and third Legacy books polished and released by this year. I’m not too sure I have a favorite, there’s something that I greatly enjoy in each of my stories, but if I had to choose, I choose the Legacy series. I had such a great time writing these books, even though I had forced myself to write one after the other nonstop. There was so much that I had put into these stories, little bits of myself stored inside. I enjoyed every character, and learning more about them as each story progressed. It really opened up my imaginary box when crafting out the Legacy tales. Even now, I’m still adding in new things before the books are submitted for editing. I adore my protagonist, Pierce Landcross. He’s one of the most entertaining characters I’ve ever created, and if the Legacy series does well, I will continue his story in the next series, The Age of the Machine.

 

Q:  When a new book comes out, are you nervous about how readers will react to it?

A:  Absolutely! No matter how good I think it is, it boils down to the reader. The worst part is giving away dozens of free copies for review, and if you’re lucky, you’ll receive maybe a few in return. When you receive no word back whatsoever, it makes you wonder if anyone is actually reading it, or if they had read it and don’t want to say anything because they didn’t like it at all. Silence is more troubling to me than getting a bad review because at least the review tells me what someone thinks of my work. I believe every writer feels that way. I mean, like all artists who toil over their craft for months or even years, putting so much time and effort to create this work of art, it becomes a very personal thing. We’re truly wearing our hearts on our sleeves, leaving us in a very vulnerable position each time we put our work out there.

 

Q:  What can we look forward to in the upcoming months?

A:  As I mentioned before, I aim to get the second and third installment of the Legacy series published. I’d like to turn the first Legacy book into an audio book, expanding its reach to more readers. Soon I’m going to offer ghostwriting services to people needing help with their own stories. Also this year, I’m planning on writing a few screenplays. Loads to do. J

 

Q:  Do you outline your books or just start writing?

A:  I do, indeed! For me, it’s a must. It helps to somewhat get a grasp of where the story is heading, how it could end and such. I jot down significant fragments of details that I would otherwise forget if I tried keeping it solely stashed away inside my head. Characters’ purposes are made known to me a little clearer, and I understand what the story will contain a little more. Even so, an outline isn’t the story, it does mean that I’ll write the book just as it is in the outline. For me, an outline is just a compass pointing me in the right direction, it’s not a barbwire fence keeping me from breaking out of my own story shell. In fact, a lot of times I’ve changed the story so much from some of the outlines that they’re completely different storylines altogether, but that didn’t mean that they weren’t helpful.

 

Q:  Do you tend to base your characters on real people or are they totally from your imagination?

A:  Mostly they come from my own imagination. There may be some traits of actual people in a few, but all in all, they’re compete creations of my own doing. Having said that, these characters of mine usual start out as complete and utter strangers to me. I’m too lazy to write out any character profile, documenting what they look like, their habits and such. I just write them. A lot of times, even with the protagonists, I have no idea who these individuals are. They’re almost like real people that you have get to know through the course of time. The more I write about them, the more I understand the kinds of people they truly are.

 

Q:  Which of your stories would make a great movie?  Who’d play the lead roles?

A:  I’d like to think that all my books would make fairly entertaining movies. *Laughs* I’ve actually been told by readers that they could see a couple of my novels made into motion pictures. But if I were to choose only one, I’d choose Legacy. There’s simply so much happening in every book, and I can envision each one being put into film. Cast wise, I’d like to have Reeve Carney from Penny Dreadful, play Pierce Landcross, Tom Mison from Sleepy Hollow as Joaquin Landcross, Millie Bobby Brown from Stranger Things, playing the young girl, Clover Norwich, Taron Egerton, soon to be playing Robin Hood, as Archie Norwich, and playing the villain, Lord Tarquin Norwich, none other than House actor, Hugh Laurie.

 

Q:  How do you approach world building? It’s a daunting task for some writers.

A:  It can be daunting. When I wrote Atlantic Pyramid, a story about people becoming lost inside the Bermuda Triangle, I needed to create a world within our own, and yet keep the two different in ways that would make sense to the reader. Make it plausible, as it were. World building takes a lot of fine detail to achieve a so-called ‘realistic’ world, and not only in how it looks, but how things function and why, how things feel, tastes, smell, the types of religious practices, cultures, etc . . . I also find that diversity is one of the strongest backbones to any good world building. Being able to bring ethnics groups to the table enhances the story, and makes it all that much more authentic no matter where this other world is. With Legacy, I used the Seven Years’ War to help create the Sea Warriors. The Sea Warriors are Native American tribes that the French had trained to be naval fleets to fight against the enemy, and had carried on ever since. There are also tinkerers who call themselves Contributors. They invent new machines and gadgets from all over this world, which opens up more diversity to the Legacy stories. The best way to approach world building is to remember that where there’s an action there’s a reaction, and that when something happens it will affect something else along the way, sometimes throughout the history of that particular world.

 

Q:  Where do you get your daily dose of news?

A:  To keep myself from falling deep into depression or going into a killing fit, I don’t keep up with the news every day. It’s not healthy in this day and age. I do rely on people like Bill Maher, John Oliver, and even The Daily Show with Trevor Noah to keep me updated. Sometimes I’ll read articles from CNN or the New York Times. Other times I’ll watch the local news, NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt, and Vice News.

 

Q:  Do you have any advice for aspiring writers?

A:  I once read that you can make anything by writing.

And it’s true! Writing opens minds, introduces new perspectives, and brings people into worlds they never knew existed. Writing is an art form that is beautiful, tragic, complex, stunning and horrifying. My best advice for aspiring writers is to develop a thick skin. Take constructive criticism with a grain of salt, and learn from what others tell you. Trust me, you’ll grow as a writer that way. And read! Read! Read! Read! When a writer is reading, it’s different than non-writers. We’re not just reading, we’re studying! We’re finding out new ways to describe things, broadening our vocabulary, and learning how these other authors thread their stories together. Whatever genre you write, reading will help significantly when you put your own pen to paper. Don’t concern yourself about getting that first rough draft just right, either. First drafts are meant to free spirits and very ugly ones too. You only need to get your story out of your head and onto paper or in a Word document. Worry about making it pretty later on during editing. And don’t rush. It’s so easy nowadays to toss out stories in front of the whole world. Yet the ease to publish shouldn’t mean that the art of writing needs to be forgotten or ignored. Writing a book or novella takes time, and ought to take just as long if not longer to make better through proper editing and revision. It’s best to sit on a manuscript for a while before going back to work on it, rather than rush in getting it done in order to publish it. It doesn’t matter how good the story is, if readers are distracted by poor writing and grammar flaws, you’ll lose them quick!

All in all, read more, write with passion, but edit with care and devotion toward the craft, and learn from others. Most of all, write what you love!

 

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Filed under Fantasy, Fiction, Interviews, steampunk

Red Haircrow’s Interview in #DerFreitag March 23rd-On #ForgetWinnetou! Doc, Native #Stereotypes & Eurocentric History

In Der Freitag’s print & online edition, on our upcoming documentary Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany, historical context and how the USA’s deliberate “alternative facts” or Eurocentric fabrication of history contributes to continuing racism, colonialism and oppression of Native Americans. Stereotypes are a symptom of the overall disease. Interview and article by Matthias Dell.

Our crowdfunding campaign is in its last days, please help us reach our goaland bring this important project to a wider audience, in its best possible form! At IndieGoGo.


Other recent interviews:

March 14th„Ich bin nur dem Nein begegnet“ at Deutschlandradio Kultur (Interview & podcast, in print & online, link to English version at the bottom of the article)

March 4th– “Glaubensbekenntnis Red Haircrow” at Süddeutsche Zeitung (Interview, in print & online)


Other important links for our documentary:

 

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Red Haircrow’s March 14th #Interview on Deutschlandradio Kultur’s Kompressor

Here’s the direct link to listen online to the interview on Deutschlandradio’s Cultural Radioshow “Kompressor”, sharing news on Native current events and talking about directing (and currently filming) “Forget Winnetou! Going Beyond Native Stereotypes in Germany”. Our documentary is on Native stereotypes in Germany, racism and colonialism, of which the 19th century created but still popular pseudo “Indian” Winnetou is the ultimate symbol. At the webpage, interview in German is at the top. To listen in English, the link is at the end of the article.

Please also visit our film website, follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, and help support our bringing it to the world. Our funding campaign is still live on IndieGoGo. Both my co-director Timo Kiesel and I are available for interview. Very welcome to share the links, thanks!

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