Fires of Alexandria by Thomas K. Carpenter

Review: I often have an interest in alternative historical fiction, especially when its subject and location is someplace other than Nazi Germany, which I feel has been played out all too often to the same tune. But Fires of Alexandria thankfully takes us to ancient Roman Empire in Egypt, and while it’s a popular theme also, the author gives an interesting view with new dynamics. The writing is vivid and well-researched, and the enthusiasm and love for the story was clear.

I felt that fewer descriptions at times could have helped me, as the reader, focus on more important points, but the characters and events were easily visualized. The paragraph structuring did become an issue, as I would have preferred ones with more than one or two sentences each, especially when they contained the same ideas or actions taking place. I felt this would have improved the flow and overall appearance of the narrative, yet the plotting and pace drive you forward to a climax and resolution that satisfies.

Thomas K. Carpenter has created a solid basis for a new series in “Fires of Alexandria”, and I thought it was an enjoyable read with a sympathetic main character I truly came to care about. Further installments would definitely be on my list of anticipated reads.

Description: The greatest mystery of the ancient world remains the identity of who set fire to the Great Library in Alexandria.

One hundred years later, Heron of Alexandria–the city’s most renown inventor and creator of Temple miracles–receives coin from a mysterious patron to investigate the crime. Desperate to be free of the debts incurred by her twin brother, she accepts and sets in motion a chain of events that will shake the Roman Empire and change the course of history forever.

  • ebook, 388 pages
  • Published February 6th 2011
  • Publisher: Black Moon Books
  • ISBN 0012856894
  • ISBN13: 2940012856890
  • Source: Author

Author Website:

http://thomaskcarpenter.com/

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Filed under Historical Fiction, Reviews

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