AlterNative Volume 11 Issue 3 Available Now! #Indigenous #Worldviews

alternative
What is AlterNative?

AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal. We aim to present indigenous worldviews and scholarly research from native indigenous perspectives from around the world. AlterNative is published quarterly in print and online. AlterNative publishes papers that substantively address and critically engage with indigenous issues from a scholarly indigenous viewpoint. All papers must address and engage with current international and national literature and academic and/or indigenous theory and make a significant contribution to the field of indigenous studies.

The latest issue of AlterNative is now available online and in print. Highlights in this issue are two articles which focus on indigenous bereavement practices. Also notable is an article from Canada which looks at the health-seeking behaviour of Aboriginal youth in distress, as well as two articles which deal with settler-colonial practices of land alienation in the 19th century.

Enjoy FREE ACCESS to the lead article “It’s like going to a cemetery and lighting a candle”: Aboriginal Australians, Sorry Business and social media by Bronwyn Carlson and Ryan Frazer, until the end of September 2015. Click here to access the article.

Articles

“It’s like going to a cemetery and lighting a candle”: Aboriginal Australians, Sorry
Business and social media

Bronwyn Carlson & Ryan Frazer

Te waiata a Hinetitama—hearing the heartsong: Whakamate i roto i a Te Arawa—
A Māori suicide research project

Tepora Emery, Candy Cookson- Cox & Ngāmaru Raerino

Examining the relationship between attachment styles and resilience levels among
Aboriginal adolescents in Canada

Johanna Sam, Hasu Ghosh & Chris G. Richardson

Kaupapa Māori theory and critical discourse analysis: Transformation and
social change

Anne- Marie Jackson

Resisting racism: Māori experiences of interpersonal racism in Aotearoa
New Zealand

Sylvia Pack, Keith Tuffin & Antonia Lyons

Economic dysfunction or land grab? Assaults on the 19th-century Māori economy
and their Native North American parallels

Hazel Petrie

Hungry times: Food as a source of conflict between Aboriginal people and British
colonists in New South Wales 1804–1846

Greg Blyton

Book Reviews
Power lines: Phoenix and the making of the modern Southwest
James Rice

When rains became floods: A child soldier’s story
Marc Becker

Remaking Pacific pasts: History, memory, and identity in contemporary theatre from Oceania
Christopher Balme

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Announcements, Native American, Reviews

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s