Category Archives: Fiction

#Author #Interview With Michelle E. Lowe on #Writing & #Steampunk Novel “Legacy”

Interview with author Michelle E. Lowe. Find them on social media:

 

Q:  Who or what was your inspiration for writing?

A:  I find that the world itself holds an abundant of inspiration. Real stories, small moments, even a basic conversation someone might be having on the bus. If a keen ear listens in at just the right time, an idea for a novel is there. I’ve gotten lots and lots of helpful insights from history and love to incorporate certain historical events into my work.

 

Q:  What books are currently on your nightstand?

A:  I’ve just started on Stephen King’s The Dark Tower series. I’m on Book One: The Gunslinger. It’s very, very good so far. I’m aiming to get through most of the series before the TV show adaptation comes out. The release date just got pushed back, so I might be able to make it.

 

Q:  What would you like readers to know about you the individual?

A:  For starters, I’m a big nerd at heart. I love watching and reading science-fiction and fantasy stories, and I highly enjoy old B horror films. I’m extremely fond of old Atari video games, like Dig Dug, Montezuma’s Revenge, Space Invaders, Centipede, Mrs. Pacman, and so on. I collect worthless little knickknacks, and I enjoy oil painting as a hobby. I’d like to do a lot more world traveling, starting with England. Also, I adore animals, and wish I had many more of them around to take care of.

 

 

Q:  What do you write?

A:  Generally, I write fiction. Recently I’ve ventured into steampunk. That’s a fun genre to go into. It takes a lot of imagination to succeed at it too. That’s what I love about fiction and writing fiction; people can play around with facts and build worlds. There’s a lot of intelligence and creativity that goes into writing fiction, I believe. There’s much that can be created, so many imaginative ways to explain how made up things function. You really work your brain coming up with how everything goes and make it believable no matter how unbelievable it is!

 

Q:  What was your first published work and when was it published?

A:  In 2011, I self-published my first novel, The Warning. I had joined the wave of entrepreneurs, staring wide-eyed at Amazon’s free self-publishing program. Freedom! We thought. A chance to show our work to the world without the gatekeepers telling us our stories aren’t good enough, or dumping thousands of dollars in a vanity press in the hopes that we’ll make that loot back. There have been loads of pros and cons with this vastness of published work constantly being pumped out; one being that it’s extremely difficult for just about any author to get notice. In the end, though, it’s nice that storytellers can share their tales without the heavy hand of Big House Publishing halting them. I will say that it is also nice to have something you’ve written recognized by a publisher.

 

Q:  Do you listen to music or have another form of inspiration when you are writing?

A:  Not only do I listen to music when I’m writing, but when I’m also planning evil deeds. 😉 Seriously, listening to music is a must for me. I’m listening to music right now while I’m answering this! The dead silence bores me to tears. When it comes to inspiration, music has helped in many ways. There have been certain songs that I’ve imagined scenes to books I’m writing or about to write. Kind of like a montage taking place inside my head. One song in particular, if I’m allowed to say it, The Underground by Jane’s Addiction, opened up ideas for me in the third installment to my Legacy series. Music is downright a wonderful art form that I never want to be too far away from.

 

Q:  Most people envision an author’s life as being really glamorous. What’s the most unglamorous thing that you’ve done in the past week?

A:  If locking yourself up inside a dark room and cutting off from the outside world for so long that your friends and family start worrying if you’re alive or dead, glamorous, than sure! Completely! I don’t view an author’s life as being glamorous in the least, but it is interesting, especially how authors are able to pull stories out of thin air, and the rituals they do to go about getting their work done. After the book is written, polished, and put out there with a shiny new-to-the-world cover; the proud author signing his or hers novel to a line of eager fans, it could appear to be glamorous, I suppose. In truth, there is a lot of self loathing, insecurity, constant self doubt, pressure and great strain that a writer is always going through, no matter what level they are in the profession. In my opinion, a cocky writer is most likely not a very good one. For a story to reach a certain peak in order to be a great tale, the writer needs to sweat, worry, and always second guess themselves. It forces us to rethink and make the book better for our readers who deserve nothing less from us. The least glamorous thing I’ve done in the past week was getting into my car and driving south toward Mexico just to get away from the frustration of writing and revising.

 

Q:  How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

A:  Published books, only eight as well as a collection of short stories. I’ve written out five more books for the Legacy series already, and have just completed a standalone for it as well. With any luck I’ll have the second and third Legacy books polished and released by this year. I’m not too sure I have a favorite, there’s something that I greatly enjoy in each of my stories, but if I had to choose, I choose the Legacy series. I had such a great time writing these books, even though I had forced myself to write one after the other nonstop. There was so much that I had put into these stories, little bits of myself stored inside. I enjoyed every character, and learning more about them as each story progressed. It really opened up my imaginary box when crafting out the Legacy tales. Even now, I’m still adding in new things before the books are submitted for editing. I adore my protagonist, Pierce Landcross. He’s one of the most entertaining characters I’ve ever created, and if the Legacy series does well, I will continue his story in the next series, The Age of the Machine.

 

Q:  When a new book comes out, are you nervous about how readers will react to it?

A:  Absolutely! No matter how good I think it is, it boils down to the reader. The worst part is giving away dozens of free copies for review, and if you’re lucky, you’ll receive maybe a few in return. When you receive no word back whatsoever, it makes you wonder if anyone is actually reading it, or if they had read it and don’t want to say anything because they didn’t like it at all. Silence is more troubling to me than getting a bad review because at least the review tells me what someone thinks of my work. I believe every writer feels that way. I mean, like all artists who toil over their craft for months or even years, putting so much time and effort to create this work of art, it becomes a very personal thing. We’re truly wearing our hearts on our sleeves, leaving us in a very vulnerable position each time we put our work out there.

 

Q:  What can we look forward to in the upcoming months?

A:  As I mentioned before, I aim to get the second and third installment of the Legacy series published. I’d like to turn the first Legacy book into an audio book, expanding its reach to more readers. Soon I’m going to offer ghostwriting services to people needing help with their own stories. Also this year, I’m planning on writing a few screenplays. Loads to do. J

 

Q:  Do you outline your books or just start writing?

A:  I do, indeed! For me, it’s a must. It helps to somewhat get a grasp of where the story is heading, how it could end and such. I jot down significant fragments of details that I would otherwise forget if I tried keeping it solely stashed away inside my head. Characters’ purposes are made known to me a little clearer, and I understand what the story will contain a little more. Even so, an outline isn’t the story, it does mean that I’ll write the book just as it is in the outline. For me, an outline is just a compass pointing me in the right direction, it’s not a barbwire fence keeping me from breaking out of my own story shell. In fact, a lot of times I’ve changed the story so much from some of the outlines that they’re completely different storylines altogether, but that didn’t mean that they weren’t helpful.

 

Q:  Do you tend to base your characters on real people or are they totally from your imagination?

A:  Mostly they come from my own imagination. There may be some traits of actual people in a few, but all in all, they’re compete creations of my own doing. Having said that, these characters of mine usual start out as complete and utter strangers to me. I’m too lazy to write out any character profile, documenting what they look like, their habits and such. I just write them. A lot of times, even with the protagonists, I have no idea who these individuals are. They’re almost like real people that you have get to know through the course of time. The more I write about them, the more I understand the kinds of people they truly are.

 

Q:  Which of your stories would make a great movie?  Who’d play the lead roles?

A:  I’d like to think that all my books would make fairly entertaining movies. *Laughs* I’ve actually been told by readers that they could see a couple of my novels made into motion pictures. But if I were to choose only one, I’d choose Legacy. There’s simply so much happening in every book, and I can envision each one being put into film. Cast wise, I’d like to have Reeve Carney from Penny Dreadful, play Pierce Landcross, Tom Mison from Sleepy Hollow as Joaquin Landcross, Millie Bobby Brown from Stranger Things, playing the young girl, Clover Norwich, Taron Egerton, soon to be playing Robin Hood, as Archie Norwich, and playing the villain, Lord Tarquin Norwich, none other than House actor, Hugh Laurie.

 

Q:  How do you approach world building? It’s a daunting task for some writers.

A:  It can be daunting. When I wrote Atlantic Pyramid, a story about people becoming lost inside the Bermuda Triangle, I needed to create a world within our own, and yet keep the two different in ways that would make sense to the reader. Make it plausible, as it were. World building takes a lot of fine detail to achieve a so-called ‘realistic’ world, and not only in how it looks, but how things function and why, how things feel, tastes, smell, the types of religious practices, cultures, etc . . . I also find that diversity is one of the strongest backbones to any good world building. Being able to bring ethnics groups to the table enhances the story, and makes it all that much more authentic no matter where this other world is. With Legacy, I used the Seven Years’ War to help create the Sea Warriors. The Sea Warriors are Native American tribes that the French had trained to be naval fleets to fight against the enemy, and had carried on ever since. There are also tinkerers who call themselves Contributors. They invent new machines and gadgets from all over this world, which opens up more diversity to the Legacy stories. The best way to approach world building is to remember that where there’s an action there’s a reaction, and that when something happens it will affect something else along the way, sometimes throughout the history of that particular world.

 

Q:  Where do you get your daily dose of news?

A:  To keep myself from falling deep into depression or going into a killing fit, I don’t keep up with the news every day. It’s not healthy in this day and age. I do rely on people like Bill Maher, John Oliver, and even The Daily Show with Trevor Noah to keep me updated. Sometimes I’ll read articles from CNN or the New York Times. Other times I’ll watch the local news, NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt, and Vice News.

 

Q:  Do you have any advice for aspiring writers?

A:  I once read that you can make anything by writing.

And it’s true! Writing opens minds, introduces new perspectives, and brings people into worlds they never knew existed. Writing is an art form that is beautiful, tragic, complex, stunning and horrifying. My best advice for aspiring writers is to develop a thick skin. Take constructive criticism with a grain of salt, and learn from what others tell you. Trust me, you’ll grow as a writer that way. And read! Read! Read! Read! When a writer is reading, it’s different than non-writers. We’re not just reading, we’re studying! We’re finding out new ways to describe things, broadening our vocabulary, and learning how these other authors thread their stories together. Whatever genre you write, reading will help significantly when you put your own pen to paper. Don’t concern yourself about getting that first rough draft just right, either. First drafts are meant to free spirits and very ugly ones too. You only need to get your story out of your head and onto paper or in a Word document. Worry about making it pretty later on during editing. And don’t rush. It’s so easy nowadays to toss out stories in front of the whole world. Yet the ease to publish shouldn’t mean that the art of writing needs to be forgotten or ignored. Writing a book or novella takes time, and ought to take just as long if not longer to make better through proper editing and revision. It’s best to sit on a manuscript for a while before going back to work on it, rather than rush in getting it done in order to publish it. It doesn’t matter how good the story is, if readers are distracted by poor writing and grammar flaws, you’ll lose them quick!

All in all, read more, write with passion, but edit with care and devotion toward the craft, and learn from others. Most of all, write what you love!

 

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Filed under Fantasy, Fiction, Interviews, steampunk

#BookReview: “A Lucky Day” by Carlos J. Server

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  • Genre: Comedy, Contemporary Fiction
  • Publication date: February 7, 2017
  • Book length: 226 pages
  • Book format: Paperback 6” x 9” / ebook format
  • Available at Amazon

Synopsis: “The largest prize ever awarded by the EuroMillions lottery has been won by a lucky someone from a small village on the French Riviera. What starts out as the happiest day in history for the local inhabitants soon turns into a race against the clock to find the lucky winner and cash in the lottery ticket. A priest with verbal incontinence, a sweet little old lady with secret sexual fantasies about the local butcher, a village mayor who’s held power for thirty years, and a mailman in love with the wife of a villainous baker are just a few of the quirky characters who will make you laugh and occasionally bring a tear to your eye as you enjoy everyday situations taken to extremes. A Lucky Day is a heartwarming comedy peopled by a highly entertaining cast of characters.”

 

 

Review: “I reviewed the English version, translated from it’s original Spanish, and one hopes the original author’s meanings were shared in every way, which can be a concern with such works. And exactly why a good translator is always prized, and deservedly can receive notice and awards of their own. So cheers, to Annie Crawford for that. For me, the main concern I had with accepting this title review was that humor can be very subjective. What one finds funny, another may not, but I was pleased to find amusing situations and great ‘one-liners’ throughout that could be universally appreciated, for the most part. A good storyteller helps you see the humor even in small gestures, looks and events, even in writing. Server was highly successful in this way.

The variety of characters presented, from a baker’s housewife with a passionate decorative affair with garden gnomes, to Sergeant Chardin, at five foot five and 265lbs, each is unforgettable. Some of the things I liked best about A Lucky Day was the balance between descriptive scenes: landscape, personal appearance, mannerisms, and the conversational dialogues. While effusive details may become tedious in a novel length work, the author never reached that point. They were relevant and very visual, helping anchor readers in the region, which most of us may have never visited nor will. There wasn’t too much dialogue nor too little. Pacing was also good, as readers already knew what the prize was from the book’s synopsis, but how it all came to pass and who eventually received the reward?

I found A Lucky Day to be a lightly comical, tightly written tale that flowed easily, where I literally laughed out loud at times and which was never overly complicated in style or presentation. It was a fun journey, which almost anyone might enjoy. I definitely recommend it, especially if seeking a fun, fast moving read as escapism from the daily issues so many people face today. ”

 

BIOGRAPHY

Carlos J. Server (Valencia, Spain, 1975) first became a household name in 2014 with his debut novel, Un día con suerte, a finalist in the First Annual Indie Literary Prize Contest cosponsored by Amazon, the prestigious Spanish newspaper El Mundo, and publisher Esfera de los Libros. Contest judges considered more than seven hundred works by authors from thirty-two countries. Un día con suerte became an overnight Internet phenomenon, quickly rising in the charts to become the No. 1 bestselling eBook in Spanish on Amazon in Spain, the United States, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Germany, France, Holland, and Italy. It has maintained its ranking in Europe as the top-selling comic novel in eBook form available in Spanish on Amazon throughout 2015 and 2016.

In 2015 Carlos Server published his second novel, Un bautizo singular, a romantic comedy of intrigue peopled by a cast of zany characters. The author is currently at work on his third novel, scheduled for publication at the end of 2016.

The global launch of A Lucky Day, the English version of Mr. Server’s first novel, will take place in February 2017, making the novel available to English-speaking readers everywhere. This will be followed in June of the same year by the publication of A Singular Baptism, the English version of his second novel.

In his fast-paced, suspenseful, highly entertaining novels, Carlos Server invites us to enjoy tales reminiscent of Billy Wilder and Woody Allen, two artists much admired by the author.

Contact: Website, Twitter, Goodreads

 

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Filed under comedy, Fiction, Reviews

#BookReview “The Hero of Lost Causes” by Phillip Frey

slowthepace450 From the  Slow the Pace anthology: “The Hero of Lost Causes”  is about “Robert Emmet was born in Ireland in 1778. Upon his twenty-third year he became angry over British rule. It then took him two years to recruit an army of farmers, shepherds and friends. When the moment of rebellion finally came, there was a miscue and a lot of confusion. As a result, the British captured Robert Emmet and executed him in 1803. Robert Emmet quickly became a romantic figure to the Irish people; to this day referred to as “The Hero of Lost Causes.”

Review:

A historical fiction by description, this short tale is actually set at a modern seaside, of a father claiming connection to the failed yet still heroic rebel. Having bought a forty-footer upon retirement as a fireman, Kevin Michael Emett (2 T’s) feels his own time has passed, but maybe his adult son Robert, who helps him out on the boat, might somehow make good on the claim…and a sudden event may just provide achievement of ancestral vindication. Add in a beautiful green-eyed young woman named Eileen and a few gentle comedic twists, and you have “The Hero of Lost Causes”, a pleasant, easy story, the last but not least in this anthology.

About the author:
Phillip Frey grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, where he performed as a child actor at The Cleveland Playhouse. He later moved to New York, where he performed with Joseph Papp’s New York Shakespeare Festival. This was followed by performing for one season as a member of The Repertory Theater of Lincoln Center.
With a change of interest Phillip wrote, directed and edited three short films, all of which had international showings, including the New York Film Festival. With yet another change of interest, Phillip moved to Los Angeles where he became a produced screenwriter. Now more recently, he has turned to prose with the books “Dangerous Times” and “Hym and Hur.” To see more about these books, please visit http://www.phillipfrey.com. “The Hero of Lost Causes” is Phillip Frey’s first publication of a short story. He wholeheartedly
thanks Scribes Valley for this distinction.

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Filed under Anthologies, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Reviews, Short Story Collections

“Werecats” Special Edition Paperback & Author Interview with Andrew J. Peters

The Popular Werecat Series Now Available as a Special Edition Paperback!

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Previously available as e-novelettes, paranormal fans can now pick up the first three installments of Andrew J. Peters’ Werecat series in one book! Included are: The Rearing (Book 1), The Glaring (Book 2) and The Fugitive (Book 3).

Here’s the back cover blurb:

“Twenty-two-year-old Jacks is on a mission to drown his past in alcohol when he meets a handsome drifter named Benoit on a lost weekend in Montréal. It’s lust and possibly something more. Jacks never suspects that a drunken hook-up will plunge him into the hidden, violent world of feline shifters.”

Praise for the Werecat series:

“Steamy enough to satisfy romance-genre die-hards. An innovative take on the shape-shifter genre; this first offering in a gay fantasy series should garner a large following.” — Kirkus Reviews

“If you’ve ever wondered what it is like to live and love as a big cat, this is the book for you.” — Wilde Oats Journal

“If you love action packed stories, more than a spot of violence, and a thread of a love story too, then you should definitely try this book.” —Sinfully Sexy Book Reviews

Paperback available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble or your favorite indie retailer, or dip your paws in the series with one of the e-books.

* * * *

Author Interview

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What’s been happening since you last stopped by to talk about Book 1 in the Werecat series?

It’s been an exciting time. 2013 was a break-out year for me after a long haul working on a number of stories and shopping them around. The Rearing came out in May of that year, and my first novel-length book The Seventh Pleiade débuted in November. I can’t say that I skyrocketed to celebrity, but I had a lot of fun with book release events and hopping around the blogosphere.

I continued the Werecat series with two more installments, and I’m currently working on the fourth and final book. Just this past year, I finished two other projects. Banished Sons of Poseidon is the follow-up young adult adventure to The Seventh Pleiade and will be coming out in October 2015 through Bold Strokes Books. In early 2016, I have another book Poseidon and Cleito coming out in a similar mythological vein, published by Edge Science Fiction & Fantasy. That book imagines the early days of the Atlantis legend.

What sort of people read your books?

I guess the common denominator is readers who like LGBTQIA fiction. Though my upcoming book Poseidon and Cleito features two hetero characters so it will be interesting to see how people respond to that. I get a lot of M/M romance readers shelving Werecat at Goodreads, and it’s been great meeting people of all ages through my young adult series. People pick up the books because they like fantasy and sometimes because they have a particular interest in Greek mythology, which is a big inspiration of mine.

Jacks, the main character in Werecat, is a self-described “Euro-American mutt” who discovers his Native ancestry, which was hidden from him. How did you go about realizing Jacks and the spiritual traditions that are behind Werecat’s mythology?

The Euro-American mutt part was easy since that’s close to home. But I definitely felt a sense of responsibility in portraying the Native aspects of his character. Jacks was raised outside of that culture so he is in a sense discovering it himself as the story progresses.

While I was working as a social worker for LGBTQIA youth, I had the privilege of having colleagues from Native communities. We collaborated to educate schools and service providers about LGBTQIA concerns and Native concerns specifically. I learned a lot from working with a great organization called the Northeast Two-Spirit Society.

Werecat took a lot of research because the premise is that shifter magic was borne from indigenous practices related to people possessing dual souls, in this case man and cat of course. That was fascinating for me to study. It took me from Amerindian spirituality to African and Indian and Asian traditions.

I mention in my Acknowledgements in The Trilogy that I don’t purport to be an authority on indigenous cultures, and my intention was to honor those traditions, not to sensationalize or exploit them. It is a fantasy world that I created, and I wanted to take a nuanced approach to the werecat/werewolf trope. I thought about werecats being “good” and “bad” guys, and being both at the same time really.

What’s next for you?

I’ve been in a pretty productive phase so I’m happy to say that I have more books coming out in 2016 and beyond. I just signed a contract with Bold Strokes Books to publish the first book in what I’m calling an alternative history series. The book is titled The City of Seven Gods, and it’s an adventure-romance set in a fantasy world that takes a lot of inspiration from Near Eastern civilizations of the ancient world.

Otherwise, I expect to have a follow up to Poseidon and Cleito coming out, and I’ll be working on a contemporary romance, believe it or not.

About the Author:

Andrew J. Peters is the author of the Werecat series and two books for young adults: The Seventh Pleiade and Banished Sons of Poseidon. He grew up in Amherst, New York, studied psychology at Cornell University, and has spent most of his career as an advocate and a social worker for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth. A lifelong writer, Andrew has written for The Good Men Project, GayYA, Dear Teen Me, La Bloga and Layers of Thought among other media. He lives in New York City with his husband and their cat Chloë. For more about Andrew, visit: http://andrewjpeterswrites.com or find him on social media.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andrewjpeterswrites
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ayjayp
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/AndrewJPeters

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Filed under Announcements, Fiction, Gay Fiction, Gay Interest, GLBTIIQ Interest, LBGT, LGBTQIA, M/M Fiction, Paranormal Fiction, Writers and Writing

Nimrod Journal: Call For #Submissions, April 2016 Edition #LGBTQIA

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

Nimrod International Journal at The University of Tulsa invites you to submit to our 2016 spring issue. Nimrod is the University of Tulsa biannual literary journal, founded in 1956 and dedicated to the discovery of emerging voices in literature.

Title:
Mirrors and Prisms: Writers of Marginalized Orientations and Gender Identities

This year has seen a remarkable shift within the United States in relation to the gay rights movement. Nimrod International Journal has historically celebrated and championed writing by people from marginalized populations, whether those be nation, ethnicity, or age. This year, we’re thrilled to announce an issue devoted to writing from LGBTQIA community.

For our Spring/Summer 2016 issue, Mirrors and Prisms: Writers of Marginalized Orientations and Gender Identities, Nimrod International Journal is seeking poems, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces from writers who identify along the LGBTQIA spectrum.

What We Are Seeking:

We invite poems, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces from writers who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, or asexual, or anywhere under the umbrella term MOGAI (marginalized orientations, gender identities, and intersex). Work may be about any subject and, while we certainly welcome work about sexual identity, coming out, etc., work submitted for the issue is not limited to these subjects.

We hope to receive a large variety of material for this issue, including work from LGBTQIA writers of color, writers of varying socio-economic status, physically different writers, and neuroatyptical writers. Most of all, we hope to be surprised.

What We Are Not Seeking (for this issue):

We are not looking for work by straight allies of the LGBTQIA movement. While allies are a vital part of the movement, in this issue we wish to focus exclusively on writing by persons of marginalized orientations and gender identities. If you are a straight ally with a piece of work related to the movement or about your own experiences with friends and family, we ask that you send your work as a general submission so that we can consider it for a future issue. In short, while we truly do want to see and consider work by allies and will accept it for future issues, we also want to clarify that this particular issue will focus on writing by LGBTQIA writers.

The Specifics:

  • Stories and creative nonfiction may be up to 7,500 words; poetry may be up to 8 pages.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Work may be about any subject and, while we certainly welcome work about sexual identity, coming out, etc., work submitted for the issue is not limited to these subjects. We seek to celebrate the writers themselves and their work, rather than to limit submissions to works that specifically address issues of sexual orientation. In other words, send us whatever you like!
  • You may submit poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, but we ask that they be sent as separate submissions.
  • Fiction should be typed, double-spaced with 1” margins on all sides, one side of plain white paper only. Poetry should be typed, one side of plain white paper only.
  • For those submitting by mail: Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2016 Theme.” Send a SASE for response. Postal submissions are free.
  • For those submitting online: You may submit work online at: https://nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit. A $3 fee is charged for online submissions to cover the administrative costs associated with those submissions.

Manuscripts accepted beginning August 10th, 2015.

Postmark Deadline: December 5th, 2015.

Publication Date: April 2016

Nimrod is published in print by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine receive two copies of the issues in which their works appears.

 

Send postal manuscripts to:

Nimrod Journal

The University of Tulsa

800 S. Tucker Dr.

Tulsa, OK 74104

Submit online at:

https://nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit

 

Questions?

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu, call (918) 631-3080, or visit us online at http://www.utulsa.edu/nimrod.
We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and/or share this announcement with writing groups and friends. We eagerly anticipate your response.
Nimrod International Journal
The University of Tulsa
800 S. Tucker Dr.
Tulsa, OK 74104
(918) 631-3080
http://www.utulsa.edu/nimrod
http://www.facebook.com/nimrodjournal
nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit

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Filed under Announcements, Anthologies, bisexual, Fiction, gay, GLBTIIQ, GLBTIIQ Interest, LBGT, lesbian, LGBTQIA, Non-Fiction, Poetry, Short Story, Short Story Collections, Submission Calls, transgender, Writers and Writing